Bio-fuels

OTHER LIQUID FUELS

UTILIZATION OF BIO-OIL PRODUCED FROM WOOD AND FIBER IN DIESEL ENGINES

Researcher: Thomas Adams, tadams@engr.uga.edu

This study seeks to examine the bio-oil produced from the pyrolysis of wood products. Specifically, it seeks to investigate the potential to use a refined oil product from this process to fuel diesel engines in motor vehicles.

The pyrolysis of organic materials is a method of obtaining useful value added products that is receiving increasing attention. A variety of byproducts are produced from this process including resins which can be used as adhesives for pressed board products, syngas which can be reformed to produce valuable hydrogen gas and liquid bio-oil, a generally low energy value light oil that can be used as a heating fuel among other uses. This study seeks to examine the bio-oil produced from the pyrolysis of wood products. Specifically, it seeks to investigate the potential to use a refined oil product from this process to fuel diesel engines in motor vehicles.

The goal of a study currently in progress is to define a set of conditions under which bio-oil produced from wood biomass can be used as a substitute for petroleum based diesel fuel in vehicular compression-ignition (diesel) engines. This study includes the analysis of physical and chemical fuel properties of this material and testing of the material in stationary, diesel test engines. Key fuel attributes such as viscosity and engine tolerance will be examined. Use of raw bio-oil in diesel engines encounters significant obstacles. Additional blending and refining steps will be examined to identify mixtures of bio-oil, biodiesel and petroleum diesel that are capable of functioning as a petroleum diesel substitute without major complication.